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After looking through some of the issue tracking sites that people  on the Self mailing list kindly pointed me to, I’ve set up a trial issue tracker for the Self project on Lighthouse.  It looks like Lighthouse has a good balance between power, simplicity and user friendliness.

It is at:  http://self.lighthouseapp.com

You can see from the information there that the current plan is to issue a new release in late January, and a hopefully final Self 4.4 on Linux and Mac in late February.

We can then move on to more exiting improvements!

I encourage everyone to add issues etc…
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Back in the far off days of 1995, when the world was young and Windows 95 was new and exciting, Sun made an introductory Self video. It’s about 20 minutes long; unfortunately the version here isn’t the best quality but it’s still a good overview of Self, Morphic and the Self VM.

It is both good and bad that most of the stuff described in this video works much the same way today—but at least Self will now run on your Macbook or Linux box!

Staring Randall B Smith, David Ungar and Mario Wolczko: Self, the Video!

Documentation is at the heart of any successful open source project and, as Self wakes from its slumbers, documentation is vital to providing a way for interested people to learn and participate.

Self has a number of manuals, as well as important published papers, but these have been available only as pdf.

Three of these manuals (the Programmers Reference Manual, the Programming Environment Manual and the Morphic Manual) have been turned into HTML and combined into the new Self Handbook, which is available to read on line at http://docs.selflanguage.org.

This is quite comprehensive—in pdf form it is at the moment around 140 pages.

Read and enjoy 🙂

David Ungar, co-creator of Self, is due to speak to the at the Stanford University Department of Electrical Engineering Computer Systems Colloquium on September 30, 2009.
The talk will cover a range of material including, in Dave’s words, “a fair amount of Self in it”.
Check out the <a href=”http://www.stanford.edu/class/ee380/”>Colloquium website</a>, which should have links to live video streaming.  There is also the possiblity that the talk will be later available from Stanford through iTunes or Youtube.

David Ungar, co-creator of Self, is due to speak to the at the Stanford University Department of Electrical Engineering Computer Systems Colloquium on September 30, 2009.

The talk will cover a range of material including, in Dave’s words, “a fair amount of Self in it”.

Check out the Colloquium website, which should have links to live video streaming.  There is also the possiblity that the talk will be later available from Stanford through iTunes or Youtube.

The new Self Linux VM is available for download in binary form from the Self website. For most purposes this will be the easiest way to get Self running on Linux.

Nevertheless, Self is an open source language and so the source for the VM is available.  If you wish to compile Self on Linux, it is quite easy and straightforward.

The binary available on selflanguage.org was compiled on Ubuntu 7.04 running in VMWare on a Macbook Pro.  The version of GCC was 4.1.2. Later versions of GCC should work, but will give a lot of warnings (“deprecated conversion from string constant to char*” – just ignore it).

From a clean Ubuntu 7.04, I installed:

  • libc6-dev
  • g++
  • flex-old
  • build-essentials
  • xorg-dev
  • libncurses5-dev

I then got a copy of the source from the Self Github repository:

git clone git://github.com/russellallen/self.git

I then cd into the Self directory and:

cd release
chmod a+x buildLinuxVM
./buildLinuxVM

This should build a stripped Linux VM and put it in the top level of your source directory.

This new group blog has been added to http://planet.smalltalk.org, so welcome to everyone reading it!

For those of you not familiar with Self, it is  a prototype-based dynamic object-oriented programming language in the Smalltalk family with an environment and virtual machine centered around the principles of simplicity, uniformity, concreteness, and liveness.

Self includes a programming language, a collection of objects defined in the Self language, and a programming environment built in Self for writing Self programs. The language and environment attempt to present objects to the programmer and user in as direct and physical a way as possible. The system uses the prototype-based style of object construction.

It is currently being reinvigorated with a new release – including a Linux version – and is Open Source under a BSD-like licence.

This blog has been set up as a central place for information on the development of Self and for discussion of Self matters by the Self and Smalltalk communities, so please join us at blog.selflanguage.org or on our mailing list.

Welcome to blog.selflanguage.org!

This is the place to keep up to date with Self development, and to learn more about using and developing with Self.

More content will be added soon, in the meantime, why not head over to the main site and download a free copy of Self for your Mac or Linux box…